coolchicksfromhistory:

coolchicksfromhistory:

Juana Briones (1802-1889)
Art by Hey Lady Wanderlust (tumblr)
A native Californian, Juana was born to a Mexican family in Santa Cruz which at that time was part of the fringes of the Spanish empire.  As a young girl, she moved with her family to the San Francisco Presidio.  Juana married at age 18 and bore eleven children, eight of whom survived into adulthood.  She also adopted an orphaned Native American girl who she raised as her own.
Juana’s husband was abusive and in 1840 Juana obtained a legal separation from him, incredibly unusual for the time.  Juana ran a dairy farm in what is today the North Beach neighborhood of San Francisco and a cattle ranch in Palo Alto.  Many Latinos lost their land due to insufficiently documented ownership when California became a state in 1850, but Juana managed to document her landownership and retain her property despite being illiterate.  Juana was also locally known as a healer who incorporated Native American traditions.   
There are numerous memorials to Juana in the Bay Area.  Plaques commemorating Juana can be found in San Francisco on the Lyon Street steps and on a bench in Washington Square Park.  A park and an elementary school in Palo Alto are named in her honor.

San Franciscans!  The California Historical Society is hosting an exhibit on Juana Briones from January 26 through June 6.
Hat tip to Tofu’s Art for pointing out the exhibit.

coolchicksfromhistory:

coolchicksfromhistory:

Juana Briones (1802-1889)

Art by Hey Lady Wanderlust (tumblr)

A native Californian, Juana was born to a Mexican family in Santa Cruz which at that time was part of the fringes of the Spanish empire.  As a young girl, she moved with her family to the San Francisco Presidio.  Juana married at age 18 and bore eleven children, eight of whom survived into adulthood.  She also adopted an orphaned Native American girl who she raised as her own.

Juana’s husband was abusive and in 1840 Juana obtained a legal separation from him, incredibly unusual for the time.  Juana ran a dairy farm in what is today the North Beach neighborhood of San Francisco and a cattle ranch in Palo Alto.  Many Latinos lost their land due to insufficiently documented ownership when California became a state in 1850, but Juana managed to document her landownership and retain her property despite being illiterate.  Juana was also locally known as a healer who incorporated Native American traditions.   

There are numerous memorials to Juana in the Bay Area.  Plaques commemorating Juana can be found in San Francisco on the Lyon Street steps and on a bench in Washington Square Park.  A park and an elementary school in Palo Alto are named in her honor.

San Franciscans!  The California Historical Society is hosting an exhibit on Juana Briones from January 26 through June 6.

Hat tip to Tofu’s Art for pointing out the exhibit.

Track Name: The Devil Went Down to Georgia
Artist: Charlie Daniels Band

bentleydierks:

Johnny, rosin up your bow and play your fiddle hard.
'Cause Hell's broke loose in Georgia and the Devil deals the cards.
And if you win you get this shiny fiddle made of gold,
But if you lose the devil gets your soul.

(Source: ledgerndary)

Hello, and welcome.

omgtheawesomeprussia:

She looked around “not much. I have just never been this far south “

"Oh? That is a shame, though I suppose it ain’t very surprising; not much reason for foreign dignitaries like yourself to be way out here. Would you like some tea, then?"

(Source: cottonandcacti)

famille-est-amour:

image

As I tend to do. I rarely leave Europe though, so this was a nice change.

Seems you may do more travelling than me, as I rarely leave the country. But ah, I ‘pose it doesn’t make much difference; there’s some states one could drive for hours and still not cross a state line. I do hope you’re enjoying Dixie, however.

(Source: cottonandcacti)

cottonandcacti started following you

samurai-girl1:

"Alright."  Michonne quickly glanced around the road and spotted the buildings through the trees.  A few seconds later she spotted a road that turned towards those buildings and turned on it.  She hoped she was going the right way as she saw the road ahead of her give way to sidewalks and buildings.  Being a town, she expected it to be populated with more walkers; she’s already spotted a few aimlessly wandering through the town.  She looked out for any stores or residences that they could look through.  "So, which building should we scope out first?"

"Which supplies you want to see about getting first?" Because he isn’t too sure which would be the most pressing matter; he knew things like food they should probably get, but concerning other supplies, he wanted to get Michonne’s opinion. "How much gas is in this thing? We may need to see if we can find a jug…"

randomintheheart:

USA

randomintheheart:

USA

ecumenicalseeker:

acquaintedwithrask:

ecumenicalseeker:

*fans self*

he’s like some sort of greek god

He’s the greek god of lumberjacks

(Source: malefig)

indiandaughter:

alabastersoul:

Ladies and gentlemen, Florida. 

indiandaughter:


alabastersoul
:

Ladies and gentlemen, Florida. 

thecivilwarparlor:


Slave Narratives- In Original Context- Interview With Lizzie Hill- Eufaula, Alabama -A Folk History of Slavery in the United States From Interviews with Former Slaves: Volume I, Alabama Narratives SPONSORED BY THE LIBRARY OF CONGRESS. Author: Work Projects Administration
Aunt Lizzie Hill, 94 years of age, moved from the Spurlock plantation, four miles out, to the city of Eufaula about 20 years ago. She was of such vigorous constitution, that until recently, she carried on her regular occupation of laundress or “wash-‘oman,” as she calls herself. Too feeble to work regularly, she now is cared for by a niece with whom she lives.
Sitting before the fire in a rocking-chair, smoking a clay pipe—her neat clothing, snow-white hair and wrinkled, kindly face make a pleasing picture of contentment. Her mind is, apparently, unimpaired, and she readily responds to her recollections of slavery:
"Sho, Missey, I ‘members ‘bout it! I was most grown when freedom come. My Marster (Richard Dozier) and my Mistis was good to all dey n*s and dey raised me right. I had two little mistises ‘bout as old as me, and I played wid dem all de time and slep’ on a pallet in dey room ev’y night. Dey slep’ on de big bed. My clothes was jes’ as good and clean as deyrn, an I et what dey et."
The little girls, she explained, were about six and eight years old when this association began, and it continued until close of the war, when all were nearly grown.
"Atter freedom come," continued Aunt Lizzie, "Mammy moved to Cuthbert and tuk me erway fum Old Mistis; but I runned away and went back to Mistis, and walked all de fourteen miles down de big road at night—I runned most ob de way. Three times I done dat, but Mammy come and tuk me back to work in de field ev’y time. I wanted to stay wid Old Mistis. Dey called her ‘Miss Everline’ and ev’ybody liked her. Bofe my little mistises got mai’ed and den Old Marster and Old Mistis moved off to Texas, and I ain’t eber seed none ob ‘em no more. I’s had a hard time workin’ in de field since de war. Fo’ freedom come, I nebber worked cep’n in de house—I was a ‘house-girl’ and didn’t do no field work."
PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK ***Illustrated with Photographs WASHINGTON 1941

thecivilwarparlor:

Slave Narratives- In Original Context- Interview With Lizzie Hill- Eufaula, Alabama -A Folk History of Slavery in the United States From Interviews with Former Slaves: Volume I, Alabama Narratives SPONSORED BY THE LIBRARY OF CONGRESS. Author: Work Projects Administration

Aunt Lizzie Hill, 94 years of age, moved from the Spurlock plantation, four miles out, to the city of Eufaula about 20 years ago. She was of such vigorous constitution, that until recently, she carried on her regular occupation of laundress or “wash-‘oman,” as she calls herself. Too feeble to work regularly, she now is cared for by a niece with whom she lives.

Sitting before the fire in a rocking-chair, smoking a clay pipe—her neat clothing, snow-white hair and wrinkled, kindly face make a pleasing picture of contentment. Her mind is, apparently, unimpaired, and she readily responds to her recollections of slavery:

"Sho, Missey, I ‘members ‘bout it! I was most grown when freedom come. My Marster (Richard Dozier) and my Mistis was good to all dey n*s and dey raised me right. I had two little mistises ‘bout as old as me, and I played wid dem all de time and slep’ on a pallet in dey room ev’y night. Dey slep’ on de big bed. My clothes was jes’ as good and clean as deyrn, an I et what dey et."

The little girls, she explained, were about six and eight years old when this association began, and it continued until close of the war, when all were nearly grown.

"Atter freedom come," continued Aunt Lizzie, "Mammy moved to Cuthbert and tuk me erway fum Old Mistis; but I runned away and went back to Mistis, and walked all de fourteen miles down de big road at night—I runned most ob de way. Three times I done dat, but Mammy come and tuk me back to work in de field ev’y time. I wanted to stay wid Old Mistis. Dey called her ‘Miss Everline’ and ev’ybody liked her. Bofe my little mistises got mai’ed and den Old Marster and Old Mistis moved off to Texas, and I ain’t eber seed none ob ‘em no more. I’s had a hard time workin’ in de field since de war. Fo’ freedom come, I nebber worked cep’n in de house—I was a ‘house-girl’ and didn’t do no field work."

PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK ***Illustrated with Photographs WASHINGTON 1941

Notte Themes     ☾